Libya, CW and the Rome Statute

Posted by Scott Spence (scott.spence) on Mar 21 2011
VERTIC Blog >> Arms Control and Disarmament

Amendment of the ICC Rome Statute to explicitly expand the ICC's jurisdiction to chemical and biological use in times of international or domestic armed conflict is now more urgent than ever. Dramatic events that have been unfolding across North Africa and the Middle East for weeks now, have taken new and astonishing turns in Libya. The Security Council referred the Libyan situation to the Prosecutor of the ICC in SC Resolution 1970, on 26 February 2011.  More recently, the Director General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons met with the Permanent Representative of Libya to that organisation, to discuss the Libyan government's responsibility for securing the chemical weapons in its possession which have yet to be destroyed under OPCW supervision. (http://www.opcw.org/news/article/opcw-director-general-meets-permanent-representative-of-the-libyan-arab-jamahiriya/).

Though it has not been confirmed that chemical weapons have been used in the strife in Libya, it has become urgently clear that the Rome Statute must be amended to explicitly expand the International Criminal Court's jurisidiction to the use of chemical and biological weapons in international or domestic armed conflict. VERTIC prepared a Brief on this matter accessed through this link: http://www.vertic.org/media/assets/Publications/VB%2014.pdf

We have also brought this Brief to the attention of the President of the Secretariat for the Assembly of States Parties, the Permanent Representative of Belgium to the UN in New York and the director of the Coalition for the International Criminal Court. We again call on all States Parties to the Rome Statute to reconsider their position on the proposed Belgium amendment.

Last changed: Mar 21 2011 at 12:20 PM

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